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Pioneer Living History featured

Exploring Pioneer Living History Museum: An Authentic, Unfinished Wild West

The Pioneer Living History Museum has an excellent collection of old buildings and period-accurate memorabilia, but for all its charm, it still feels like the town left behind. And that’s exactly the village’s appeal. If you want a polished, movie-set version of the west, go to Rawhide. If you want the slow, weary pace of life in a frontier town never fully realized, the Museum has your number, and in that sense it offers a more realistic western experience than many tourist attractions in the metro area.

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Walt Whitman

What Walt Whitman Got Right in His 1858 Men’s Health Guide

Leaves of Grass is now considered an icon of American poetry, but it wasn’t an overnight success. The first two editions of the collection sold modestly, and in 1858, at the age of 39, Walt Whitman was far from becoming the folk legend he is today. That same year, a man named Mose Velsor began writing a weekly column for The New York Atlas called “Manly Health and Training,” a collection of anecdotal tips on men’s health. The column covered a little of everything: walking in nature, eating properly, maintaining a beard, working out with the everyday objects around you, taking in fresh air. That sort of thing.

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Rattlesnakes Intro

Hubris and the Serpent: The Truth About Rattlesnake Bite Victims

In a grizzled true story detailed in his book Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon, Michael P. Ghiglieri recounts a close-encounter involving a rattlesnake coiled up on a woman’s chest as she slept while camped along the Colorado River while guiding a rafting trip in 1987. The woman's friend noticed the serpent's temporary sleeping arrangement and alerted Ghiglieri to the situation. Thinking on his feet, he used an 18-inch long folding shovel to remove the rattler from the woman’s chest without anyone suffering a snakebite — or even a disturbance of the woman’s sleep.

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